Top 5 Expedition Backpacks For 2016

Featured

Heading into 2016, expedition backpackers have many options when it comes to choosing a big backcountry backpack. A few years ago, the focus then was on interior capacity, where now-a-days, gear is getting so light and compact that a smaller backpack (50-75 Liters vs 100+ from a couple years ago) can be used on 2-8 day trips and more. Let’s take a look at our top 5 best expedition backpacks for 2016 (which might not necessarily be new pack models).

#5 – Mountainsmith Lookout 50 ~ $180

The Mountainsmith Lookout 50 backpack might be a little on the small side for an expedition backpacking trip, but there are plenty of larger options below to choose from. We couldn’t leave it off the list, especially at this price point and with its features. The Lookout features excellent padding on the shoulder pads and hip belt and is a very comfortable bag with a sweetspot weight range right around 40-45 pounds. Once again, this might not be big enough if you plan to pack gear for mountaineering, but can handle a week long trip no problem. At this price point, you can’t go wrong, and is about as good as it gets bang for buck. Click the following link to pick up your Mountainsmith Lookout 50 (or step up to the Mountainsmith Apex 80) today.

#4 – The North Face Banchee 65 ~ $250

The North Face Banchee 65 features a proprietary OPTIFIT technology that helps you to dial in your fit no matter your body type, male or female, short or tall. We found this pack to be very comfortable because of this. It also weighs 3.6 pounds, which is pretty light for an expedition pack of this size. We found that the sweetspot for the weight is right around 50 pounds. Who wants to pack around more than that anyway, right? The Banchee does a great job distributing the weight with its suspension system, and is a joy to carry around for long periods of time. Click the following linkto pick up your North Face Banchee 65 today.

#3 – Osprey Xenith 75 ~ $320

The Osprey Xenith is one of the best performing expedition backpacks on the market today. It is comfortable, durable, and has the capacity to pack for an extended stay trip no problem. The 105 Liter incarnation made the list in place of the retired Argon a couple years ago, and there are good reasons that it is back for 2016: the Xenith is a well put together backpack, with 4 access points to the main compartment, as well as well placed external storage pockets. This makes it easy to pack and unpack. The external hydration pocket is another nice feature that helps you re-fill your hydration source without having to dig out your pack’s contents. The sweetspot for the weight is right around 60 pounds, which is a ton of gear in my book. The Xenith doesn’t lack in the comfort arena either, as it features great suspension and cushion, as well as a decently breathable mesh backing for those hot summer days. If you are looking for a no joke top of the line expedition backpack, the Osprey Xenith will deliver every time. Order yours through Amazon by clicking the following link.

#2 – Mountain Hardwear South Col 70 ~ $300

With a sweetspot around 55 pounds, the South Col 70 from Mountain Hardwear is a durable workhorse to get you there and back again. It is designed for mountaineering applications, but is more than adequate for extended-stay trips as well. The South Col weighs in a smidge over 4 pounds, which makes it a lightweight option in the expedition backpack category. Some of the weight was trimmed from the padding, as the shoulder and hip pads are noticeably thinner and less substantial than most packs in this category. We found the pack to be comfortable enough at the 55 pound sweetspot, but carrying more weight made a noticeable difference in comfort, so keep that in mind. One of the best features of the pack is the waterproof main compartment. No more worries about soggy gear if you don’t get your rain gear on quickly during a sudden downpour. Your main gear will stay bone dry. This feature has won over more than one field tester. Overall, the Mountain Hardwear South Col 70 is a fantastic option and was only beat out by one other bag on this list. Simply put, it is one of the best expedition backpacks on the market today. Click the following link to pick yours up today.

#1 – Gregory Baltoro 75 ~ $320

Coming in at #1 is the redesigned Gregory Baltoro 75. A few years ago, this bag was on the cusp of making the list, but was edged out by two other Gregory packs (the Whitney and the other being the audacious Denali Pro), and it was no secret why they featured 2 bags in our top 5. Gregory makes some of the most comfortable bags on the market, from the shoulder harness systems to the hip belts. They are just a pleasure to wear, and none more so than the Baltoro 75 (and its little brother the 65). All the way up to 60 pounds, this pack is comfortable and agile while on uneven terrain. Other features of this bag include an integral rain cover, 3 access points to the main compartment, divided lid compartment, a detachable day pack, large hip belt pockets (1 waterproof), and a re-worked design that makes the pack 12% lighter than its previous incarnation. This is a serious expedition backpack that is as durable as it is comfortable. If you are in the market for a do-it-all extended stay backpack, look no further than the Gregory Baltoro 75. Click the following link to order our number 1 expedition backpack for 2016, the Gregory Baltoro 75 today!

Backpacking Samurai Thoughts

As backpacking gear gets smaller and lighter, gone are the days when expedition backpackers need bags in the 100+ Liter range. You’re not doing yourself any favors bulking up to 80 pounds+ anyway. Slimmer, lighter expedition backpacks in the 50-75 Liter range are taking the spotlight, and the 5 packs above are all excellent choices, from the affordably priced Mountainsmith Lookout 50 to the Gregory Baltoro 75. Ultimately, comfort won out, as the Gregory Baltoro 75 just wasn’t matched by any other pack on our list.

What do you think of the list of expedition backpacks above? What is your top expedition backpack of choice? Let us know in the comment section below. As always, thanks for reading and happy trails!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Kelty Coyote 80 Backpack – Bargain Backpackers Pack

[amazon_link id=”B0113LLUEE” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Kelty Coyote 80 Internal frame Backpack (Cypress, Medium/Large - 17.5 - 21 Torso)[/amazon_link]Kelty is a name that is well known in outdoor circles. Their products are high quality and durable, and their prices don’t break the bank. The Kelty Coyote 80 backpack is no exception. Built on an internal frame system, the Coyote 80 pack offers several features to the bargain minded backpacker. Let’s look at some of these features and highlights below.

Features

The Coyote 80 features S-shaped shoulder pads that fit the contours of your body, providing comfort and stability without causing excess chaffing. The Rip-and-Stick adjustment allows you to configure the frame to fit your torso length. Several stability adjustments, including the sternum strap, stabilizer straps, and belt stabilizers help to stabilize the load while hiking uneven and rough terrain.

Other highlights include:

  • Hydration sleeve and port
  • 8 exterior pockets + main interior compartment
  • Two access points – top and side
  • Daisy chain for extra gear attachment
  • Two ice axe loops
  • Removable lid converts into waist pack

Backpacking Samurai Thoughts

The Kelty Coyote 80 offers great value to any bargain minded backpacker. It is simply loaded with features and pockets, and provides a large amount of interior capacity (4750 cubic inches) for the overall weight of 5 pounds 9 ounces. If you are looking for a mid-sized backpack capable of carrying heavy loads for extended trips with the added bonus of not breaking the bank, the Kelty Coyote 80 pack is a great option for you. Click the following link to purchase yours today!

[amazon_link id=”B0113LLUEE” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Kelty Coyote 80 Backpack[/amazon_link]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 Expedition Backpack – High Value Climbing Pack

[amazon_link id=”B005W39GB4″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 Backpack Black Large[/amazon_link]The Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 expedition backpack is the next best thing to a pack mule. With ample internal storage, along with exterior add-on space, the BMG delivers and allows you to pack everything minus the kitchen sink. This expedition series backpack is designed for professional climbers and guides as it handles huge loads with ease. Let’s look at some of the features and highlights of the Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 backpack below.

Features

Mountain Hardwear is a brand that provides quality and value with their products. The BMG 105 is no exception. When it comes to comfort, the BMG offers a few features that need a spotlight:

  • The low profile FitLock hipbelt allows for a custom fit to the contours of your hips. This allows for improved support and comfort when dealing with heavy loads.
  • The Alpine suspension system provides stability and comfort while improving support.
  • The Alpine compression strap system allows you to compact your gear down to the lowest profile possible. The straps are easily manipulated with gloved hands, and they are removable when not needed.

Additional highlights of the BMG 105 include:

  • Removable horizontal aluminum stay behind hipbelt
  • The ability to add up to 625 additional cubic inches of capacity with a removable skirt extension
  • Removable top lid doubles as fanny pack
  • Multiple lash points for added gear
  • 840D Ballistic Nylon bottom flap material for added durability and weather protection
  • 5 exterior pockets + main compartment + sleeping bag compartment
  • Two access points – top and bottom

Backpacking Samurai Thoughts

The Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 backpack is a wonderful example of a great mix of value and high-quality features. It is hard to beat the price of this backpack when compared with other expedition/climbing backpacks, and the amazing thing is that quality and features do not suffer. The BMG 105 is offered in 3 sizes (S,M,L), and the capacity ranges from 5800-7000 cubic inches. The average weight of an empty pack is an incredible 5 pounds 3 ounces.

If you are looking for one of the best values in climbing/expedition backpacks when looking at comfort, durability, and capacity, look no further than the Mountain Hardwear BMG 105. Click the following link to purchase yours today!

[amazon_link id=”B005W39GB4″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 Expedition Backpack[/amazon_link]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Gregory Backpack General Fit Guidelines

It is vital when choosing a backpack that you first take the proper measurements of your torso length. This is the same, no matter what brand of backpack you buy. Gregory offers a PDF document that sums up all the sizing and fitting guidelines that can be found here. This article will briefly go over the main points to add a bit more information and experience behind adjusting and fine-tuning Gregory backpacks.

Frame Sizing

Take the measurement from your C7 vertebrae to your Illiac Crest. To find your C7 vertebrae, lean your head forward, and it is the most prominent bone sticking out where your neck flares out to meet your shoulders. Your Iliac Crest is the spot on the spine that is level with the top of your hip bones. Feel for your hips at your sides and trace the point around to your back. Use a flexible tape measure or the Gregory Fit-O-Matic tool to measure this length (your torso length). Do it a few times to make sure it is as accurate as possible. Use the fitting guide below to match the size of the pack you want to your torso length. Note – If you are between two sizes (overlap between small and medium), be sure to go with the smaller size. The extra 200 cubic inches isn’t worth risking an improper fit. Going with the smaller size will make for a more comfortable fit in the long run.

Gregory Sizing ChartWaist Belt Fitting

Follow the below instructions: (from the fitting guide PDF)

  • Fit your harness and belt size first.
  • Install the belt by sliding the plastic load transfer panel through the webbing and pocket sleeve on the waist belt.
  • Load your pack with 15-20 pounds of weight. Fitting your pack empty will result in improper fit.
  • Put on the pack, and secure the shoulder harness first. Adjust the harness until the top of the iliac crest is even with the top of the waist belt.
  • Shrug your shoulders and fasten the belt.
  • Suck in your belly and tighten the belt tighter than you would normally wear it. This ensures that the waist belt covers your iliac.
  • Pull the quick-adjust tabs behind the waist belt and the belt should automatically register your hip angle.
  • Release the tabs and the belt will lock into place, providing maximum comfort and load transfer.
  • Make sure you can lift your leg to 90 degrees (see image below) and check for even pressure between your body and the top and bottom edge of the waist belt.
  • Confirm equal settings on both sides using the scale. Manually adjust with the pack off if necessary.

90 DegreeShoulder stabilizer adjustments

See the image below to adjust your shoulder stabilizers to the proper angle (pack dependent):

Stabilizer Anglers ChartThese guidelines are designed to help you have the most comfortable fit with your new Gregory backpack. Fine-tuning these adjustments will take practice, and often will occur while on the trail. Don’t be afraid to experiment with adjustments while on a hike, as this is the best way to familiarize yourself with how to maximize your comfort level when on the trail.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Gregory Whitney 95 Backpack – Full Size Champ

[amazon_link id=”B001BBPZ84″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Gregory Whitney 95 Backpack (Trinidad Blue,Small)[/amazon_link]With its ability to offer support and comfort, and the seemingly endless possibilities with respects to its customization to fit your needs as a backpacker, the Gregory Whitney 95 backpack delivers one of the best values of high-quality backpacks on the market today. Offered in two color choices (a very outdoorsy Humboldt Green and a more trendy Trinidad Blue), the Whitney 95 falls more on the end of extended-stay backpacking trips with its capacity ranging from 5300 to 6300 cubic inches (sizes S,M,L). And with an overall weight of only 6 pounds 9 ounces (average), the Whitney 95 offers an incredible amount of internal space and other features, which we will dissect below.

Features

The Gregory Whitney 95 backpack features the Response Custom Fit Suspension (CFS, image below), which provides:

  • Twin aluminum stays which are supported by a horizontal cross stay, preventing barreling.
  • A smooth piston-like movement of the stays while you walk, providing flexibility and adding comfort.
  • The quick adjust 5 point angle waist belt, which allows for the perfect fit to the contour of your hips by easily adjusting a quick release tab.
  • Co-molded anti-slip lumbar pads, providing maximum comfort and weight transfer.

Gregory Response CFS

The Whitney 95 also features the Auto-Cant Shoulder Harness, which features a rotating plate attachment for your harness to the pack frame that allows the shoulder pads to easily and fluidly adjust to the contours of your neck and shoulders. This eliminates friction and rubbing that cause hot spots, adding comfort to your hiking experience.

Other highlights and features include:

  • Hydration sleeve with dual tube ports
  • Water resistant zippers
  • Water and wear resistant bottom panel material
  • Removable top pocket – converts into fanny day pack
  • Dual waist belt pockets
  • 4 access points – front, side, top, and bottom
  • 9 exterior pockets + internal compartment + sleeping bag compartment

Backpacking Samurai Thoughts

Two of our writers swear by this backpack, and only trek with it. The Gregory Whitney 95 Backpack delivers when it comes to comfort, durability, and capacity better than most competitors on the market. Most reviewers are amazed by the customer service rendered by Gregory, and I have been amazed with their ability to replace small buckles and the like that have broken at no cost to me. If you are looking for a high quality and great value high capacity backpack just under the expedition series, the Whitney 95 is for you. Click the following link to order yours now.

[amazon_link id=”B001BBPZ84″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Gregory Whitney 95 Backpack[/amazon_link]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Gregory Denali Pro 105 Expedition Backpack

[amazon_image id=”B00ITP8MH6″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”large” ]Gregory Mountain Products Denali 100 Backpack, Basalt Black, Large[/amazon_image]

The Gregory Denali Pro 105 Expedition Backpack is not for the faint of heart. The Denali Pro has been around for a long time, and has proven to be one of the best expedition backpacks on the market in every category, from fit and comfort to accessibility and durability. In 2003, Backpacker Magazine Gear Guide awarded the Gregory Denali Pro 105 as “The Best Value Expedition Pack,” and for good reason. Today, the Denali Pro 105 pack is a great value when compared with other expedition packs on the market. Let’s look at some of the features below.

Features

The Denali Pro 105 features the best of Gregory’s backpacking technology. At the top of the list is the Auto-Cant shoulder harness, which automatically adjusts to your neck and shoulder’s unique contours when you put the pack on. There is a rotating auto-cant attachment point on the frame of the pack that allows for this, which eliminates hot spots and friction on your shoulders and neck. It’s all about comfort and the features keep coming.

Next up is the Adjust-A-Cant waist belt. This customizable waist belt allows you to fit the angle of the belt to the contour of your hips, allowing the maximum comfort and load transfer distribution.

These specific features allow for a comfortable hike capable of carrying loads in excess of 100 pounds. Let’s look at some of the other highlights of this pack:

  • 5 exterior pockets (2 large mesh pockets) + interior compartment + sleeping back compartment
  • Cordura nylon/spectra nylon for durability
  • Waterproof Shelter-Rite material shields the bottom of the pack from the elements and wear and tear
  • Multiple compression straps
  • Vinyl reinforced ski slots
  • Two ice axe loops
  • Daisy chain for extra gear attachment
  • Two access points to your gear – top and side entry
  • Separate sleeping bag compartment

Backpacking Samurai Thoughts

It’s hard to argue with the value that is delivered by the Gregory Denali Pro 105 backpack. This is a beast of a pack, capable of enormous loads. Yet with Gregory’s proven harness and waist belt systems, the weight is distributed to the legs effortlessly, ensuring maximum comfort on long hikes in extreme conditions. The pack is offered in chile red, and has a capacity of 6100-7000 cubic inches, depending on the size (S,M,L). The weight of the pack averages 7 pounds 12 ounces. If you are looking for an award winning heavy-duty expedition pack, look no further than the Gregory Denali Pro 105 backpack.

[amazon_link id=”B00J07XSDA” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Gregory Denali Pro 105 Expedition Backpack[/amazon_link]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Arcteryx Bora 95 Hip Belt Assembly

This is a brief explanation of the instructions on how to assemble the hip belt that comes with your Arcteryx Bora 95 backpack. Below, we will walk through the 4 steps that are included on the illustration from the Arcteryx website, which you can download from this link – How To Assemble Arcteryx Bora Hipbelt. It is not a difficult process, but there is no explanation that accompanies the guide. Since there are no words describing what goes on, I have walked through the assembly process enough to add a few helpful comments below. Let’s get started.

Step 1

The first step to assembling the hip belt is to fold down the lower back support as shown in the image below. There is Velcro that attaches this pad to the backpack, so you just pull it down and it will reveal a Velcro attachment platform.

Arcteryx Bora - How To Assemble Hipbelt Step 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2

With the Velcro attachment revealed, line the hip belt up against the 2 dark Velcro straps and press firmly. Velcro on the back and front of the hip belt will attach the back to the pack.

Arcteryx Bora 95 How To Assemble Hipbelt Step 2

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3

Lift the bottom flap up that you pulled down in step 1 and press firmly to attach it to the Velcro.

Arcteryx Bora 95 How To Assemble Hipbelt Step 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4

Filter the straps through the plastic guides and tighten against your pack. These straps are the Load Transfer adjustment straps, and govern the tightness that your backpack transfers the weight to your hips.

Arcteryx Bora 95 How To Assemble Hipbelt Step 4

 

 

 

 

 

To dis-assemble, reverse the steps in sequence, and viol la! Hopefully this helps. If you don’t have your Arcteryx Bora 95 Pack yet, click the link to purchase one.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Arcteryx Bora 95 Packing Guide

[amazon_link id=”B0012PQX9E” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Arc'teryx Bora 80 Backpack - 4390-5000cu in Deep Blue, Tall[/amazon_link]If you are planning a backpacking trip to try out your Arcteryx Bora 95 backpack, it is important that you pack your gear properly. Make sure that you have assembled your hip belt properly, and that you have made all the adjustments to properly fit the pack to the contours of your body. Once you are sure that you have the right fit, you will need to pack your gear in a way that makes your hike comfortable. Below, we will discuss what you need to think about when packing your Bora 95 for an extended backpacking trip.

How long will you be on the trail?

Will you be hiking for a few days, 4-5 days, or more than 1 week? This is the first step in packing your backpack. You need to know exactly how long you will be away from home. This will help you to gather the essential gear that you will need while on the trail. The Arteryx Bora 95 is built to allow you to carry a ton of gear, for hiking trips of extended lengths of time. You can always carry less gear for shorter trips, but it is nice knowing that this bag is ready for an extended expedition.

What items will you be bringing?

Once you have an estimated time on the trail, you can begin to gather all the different gear you will need for that length of time. Think about the food you will bring and how to prepare it. Think about water filtration and storage. Think about clothing, camping accessories, sleeping gear, and a tent. All of this gear takes up space and adds weight to your overall pack. Ounces add up, so make sure you are not bringing along non-essential items.

Steps for Packing Your Arcteryx Bora 95 Pack

I like to start packing by laying out all the gear I will be bringing along on the floor in categories. I also like to have a scale handy to make sure I am not bringing heavy junk that I won’t be using. Compress your sleeping bag and stow it away first in the bottom of your pack (in the sleeping bag compartment). Once that is out of the way, you will need to group things together by weight and bulk. Depending on the type of hike you will be on, follow the image below to load your gear into the internal compartment:

Arcteryx Bora 95 Packing GuideIf you will mostly be hiking on flats or gradual climbs, load your heaviest items (like your cook stove or tent components) following the middle picture. If you will be going up and down on sharper inclines and declines, load your heaviest items lower against your back. Fill in the areas around these heavy items will clothing, accessories, and other light items.

Packing the right gear in the correct layout will mean that your backpacking trip will be the most comfortable and enjoyable experience possible. If you don’t have your Arcteryx Bora 95 Pack yet, click the link to purchase one. Happy trails!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Arcteryx Bora 95 Backpack Fitting Guide

[amazon_link id=”B0012PQX9E” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Arc'teryx Bora 80 Backpack - 4390-5000cu in Deep Blue, Tall[/amazon_link]The Arcteryx Bora 95 is a beast of an expedition backpack to say the least. This backpack is an absolute monster when it comes to interior capacity. With a fully loaded Bora 95, you could be carrying in excess of 100 pounds with all the room available, so it is important that you have the proper fit. Once you have figured out the proper size that you need, you will need to be able to fit the pack to the contours of your body. Below, we will go over how you can adjust and configure your Arcteryx Bora 95 to fit your body in the proper manner.

Shaping the Aluminum Frame Stays

The first thing to check is if your back is resting flush against the aluminum support of your pack. Fill up your Bora 95 with a regular sized load. See the packing guide here. Put the pack on and stand up straight. Tighten the belt and straps as best as possible, we will discuss the proper adjustment for those below. Your back should rest flush with the aluminum stays of your pack. If they are not, you will need to bend them to fit the contour of your back. This will ensure that as you hike, you are receiving the right support from the pack, which will increase comfort and decrease back pain.

Your aluminum stays can be accessed through Velcro flaps in the main compartment of your pack. Remove the stays. Remove your hip belt from the pack (see How To Assemble Your Arcteryx Bora Hip Belt). Strap on the belt with the aluminum stays in their grooves in back. The two stays should be splayed out across your shoulder blades as shown in the first image below. With you wearing the belt and stays, have someone help you by slightly bending the stays to fit the contour of your back, going one at a time. Bend the stays a little at a time, so you don’t over-bend them. Bending aluminum back and forth weakens the metal. Images 2 and 3 below illustrate the proper bending technique.

Arcteryx Pack Fitting Aluminum

Once you are confident that the contour of your back is flush with the stays, replace them in the pack and re-assemble the hip belt.

Hip Belt Adjustment

Once your pack fits the contours of your back, it is time to fine-tune the other straps, starting with the hip belt. The key to fitting the hip belt properly is to center the hip pads at the top of your hip bone (Iliac Crest) on either side. You don’t have to have a full load, but make sure you have at least 20 pounds evenly dispersed throughout your pack (not all at the bottom). Wrap the hip belt around your waist and clip it in. Center the pads top to bottom at the tip of your hip bones. You should feel the weight shifting from your shoulders and back to your hips once your belt is tight and secured. See the image below:

Arcteryx Bora Belt FittingThe next adjustment to make on your belt is the flare angle, and can add more comfort to your pack. The flare angle has to do with the angle at which your hip pads flare away from below your hip bones. Women will want their belts flared out more than men will. This will keep the weight of your pack from digging into your hips while you hike. To do this, you simply adjust the exit angle of the straps. The rest is done by the contour of your hips. See the image below for an illustration of this adjustment:

Bora Belt Fitting 2

The last fine-tune adjustment on the hip belt involves the load transfer area. This is a direct frame-to-hipbelt transfer of weight, allowing you to have a more upright hiking posture. Tightening these straps increases forward load transfer (the ability to walk more upright), and loosing them will allow for more hipbelt movement. See the image below for an illustration of the location of the straps:

Bora 95 Load Transfer Adjustment

Bora Shoulder Straps

The next adjustment to make is on your shoulder straps. Your shoulder straps are sized to fit your torso when you purchase your pack. The top of the yoke of your pack should be about level with the top of your clavicle (collarbone). Tighten your shoulder straps by pulling down on the tabs until your straps are about 2 inches under your armpit. Don’t tighten them so much that you run out of tab length. Look at the diagram below, and the load lift straps should be at an angle of 40-60 degrees.

Bora Shoulder Strap AdjustmentOnce your shoulder straps are snug, you need to fine tune the load lifters. These straps perform the task of ‘lifting’ your straps from your shoulders, keeping the pack’s weight directly off of your back and on your hips. Look at the image below to see the range of angles:

Bora Load Lifters Adjustment

Fine tuning the adjustments of your Arcteryx Bora 95 backpack will allow you to hike in more comfort. Use this guide to prepare you backpack for an extended expedition.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Arcteryx Bora 95 Expedition Backpack

[amazon_link id=”B0012PQX9E” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Arc'teryx Bora 80 Backpack - 4390-5000cu in Deep Blue, Tall[/amazon_link]When it comes to expedition backpacking, Arcteryx really comes through with high-quality and sturdy products. Their backpacks are rugged and durable enough to handle rough terrain for many years. The Arcteryx Bora 95 is no exception. This is a beast of a backpack designed to haul mega loads for extended expeditions on the the trail. Let’s look at some of the features of this backpack below.

The Arcteryx Bora 95 backpack has 5,200-6,000 cubic inches of interior cargo space (depending on the model) and is made with waterproof urethane coated fabric and water tight zippers to help keep all of your gear dry. The materials used include:

  • 210D Invista HT Ripstorm – Lining
  • 420D Invista HT Ripstorm – Body
  • 630D Invista HT Superpack nylon reinforcement
  • Thermoformed HDPE framesheet 6061 aluminum stays

There are multiple methods for accessing your packed gear. The top closure allows for easily stuffing in extra gear. A full length side zipper allows full access to all of your pack’s contents without having to remove and re-pack everything. Accessing the gear closest to the bottom of the pack is easy with the bottom access zipper.

There are also exterior pockets to help organize additional gear. Two lid pockets, one front pocket, and two side pockets allow you to add gear to the outside of your main compartment for easy access. There is an internal sleeping bag compartment that easily holds your bag separate from the rest of your gear. As with just about every backpack on the market, the Arcteryx Bora also includes a hydration bladder pouch for easy storage and compartmentalization of your H20.

Other features of the Bora include:

  • Two ice axe loops
  • Two external daisy chains
  • Key clip
  • Two external water bottle pockets
  • Hydration system hose clip
  • Six external compression straps

There are a couple of cool features included on the Bora that you might not find with other backpack brands. The first is something they call the ‘occipital cavity.’ This molded-in cavity allows your head to have full range of motion, and is a welcome and comfortable feature included by Arcteryx in this pack. Another feature of the Bora is that the top lid is removable, includes an integral waist belt, and can double as a waist pack, which is perfect for day hikes once you have established your base camp.

There are 3 different torso sizes of the Bora 95, with a short, regular, and tall option. There are also 2 different color options. The image at the top is the deep blue option, and the Bora 95 also comes in black.

To have the most comfortable backpacking experience possible, make sure you purchase a backpack that fits your torso. Click here for the torso sizing chart for the Arcteryx Bora.

Here is a breakdown of the capacity and weight of each model:

  • Short – 5248 cubic inches – 7 pounds
  • Regular – 5614 cubic inches – 7.5 pounds
  • Tall – 6041 cubic inches – 7.7 pounds

When looking at these weights above, the Arcteryx Bora 95 might not be the lightest-weight backpack on the market, but it is also not a minimalist backpack by any stretch. For the internal capacity, this backpack actually stacks up very well against the competition with regards to weight. The Arcteryx Bora 80, which has basically all the same features as the 95, is a step down in size and weight (and price as well), with the regular size weighing 6.5 pounds and having a capacity of 5248 cubic inches.

The Arcteryx Bora 95 expedition backpack gets high customer reviews. Many relate how durable and rugged the pack is, while others are impressed with the capacity that the Bora delivers. If you are looking for one of the best quality expedition series backpacks available on the market, look no further than the Arcteryx Bora 95. Click the link to purchase the:

[amazon_link id=”B0012PQX9E” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Arcteryx Bora 80 Pack[/amazon_link]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail